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 Marriage Registration in Ireland

Marriage is a solemn legal contract; therefore it is vital that all the necessary preliminaries for a marriage be completed in order that the marriage is legally valid. The marriage provisions of the Civil Registration Act, 2004 became law on 5th November 2007. This legislation brought about major changes in the procedures for solemnising and registering marriages in the republic.  The Act was subsequently amended by the enactment of the following:

  • The Civil Registration (Amendment) Act 2012 which became law on 23rd January 2013.
  • The Civil Registration (Amendment) Act 2014 which became law on 18thAugust 2015.
  • The Marriages Act 2015 which became law on 16th November 2015.

The information on this webpage reflects the requirements of the new legislation and should be noted carefully.

To make an appointment to give Notification of Intention to Marry ("Three months’ notice") to a Registrar, you should contact your local Civil Registration Office or Health Service Executive (HSE) headquarters.

Click on www.civilregistrationservice.ie to get details for local Civil Registration Service Offices (some counties have more than one Registration Office; the HSE will be able to advise you accordingly)

There is also an online appointment booking system which will allow couples intending to marry to book their appointment with a Registrar to give 3 months’ notice. Please click on www.crsappointments.ie

NOTE: This web page is designed to provide general information on the solemnisation and registration (in the civil records) of a valid marriage in Ireland. This page does not purport to be a legal interpretation of the relevant legislation and should not be construed as such. Nor does it deal with the religious preliminaries which are required for church or other religious marriage. The relevant religious preliminaries should be arranged with the appropriate celebrant of marriages. Nor does it deal with secular preliminaries which are required for secular marriages. The relevant secular preliminaries should be arranged with the appropriate celebrant of marriages.

 

SECTION 1: Preliminaries to a valid Marriage, including the Marriage Notification Process

THIS APPLIES TO ALL MARRIAGES
To contract a valid marriage in this state the parties to the marriage must:

  • have the capacity to marry each other;
  • freely consent to the marriage; and,
  • observe the marriage notification process as required by the laws of this State (detailed below).

Marriage by civil ceremony is a civil contract. Marriage by certain religious and secular ceremonies is also recognised by civil law as being a civil contract. Persons wishing to get married by religious or secular ceremony should approach the authorities of the religious denomination or secular body concerned for advice on how to proceed, and also make an appointment to attend their local Registrar. Those wishing to get married by civil ceremony should make an appointment to attend a Registrar of Civil Marriages. Some counties have more than one registrar; the HSE will be able to advise you of their contact details.
List of HSE Registration Offices on www.civilregistrationservices.ie

1.1 Minimum Age of Marriage:

From August 1, 1996 (under the Family Law Act, 1995) the minimum age at which a person, ordinarily resident in the State, may contract a marriage valid in Irish law is eighteen years of age; whether the marriage takes place in Ireland or elsewhere. This provision also applies where one party to the proposed marriage is over 18 years of age whether the marriage takes place in Ireland or elsewhere and the other is under 18, and to all non-residents who are marrying in the State. All persons applying to marry in the State must provide a Registrar with evidence of age and identity. Failure to produce such evidence will result in refusal to proceed with the marriage. Persons aged under 18 must obtain the permission of the Circuit Family Court or the High Court to get married.

If the permission of the Circuit Family Court or High Court has not been obtained and either party to the marriage is under eighteen years of age, the Registrar or person solemnising the marriage must not proceed with the marriage ceremony. Any party to such marriage, or any Registrar or person solemnising a marriage, who is convicted of knowingly breaching the provisions regarding the minimum age for the marriage shall be liable to a fine of up to €635.

There is no requirement to obtain parental consent for a marriage.

1.2 The Marriage Notification Process

After 5th November 2007 any couple proposing to marry should begin the process by contacting their local Registration Office to make an appointment to meet the Registrar to give him/her their marriage notification. Notifications can be taken only by prior appointment with the Registrar. While only three months’ notice is required by law, couples are advised to contact the Registrar well over three months before their intended date of marriage to ensure they can get a timely appointment. The notification details will be entered on a computerised notification system by the Registrar on the basis of the information given by the couple. When attending the Registrar's office in relation to the notification, the couple must also pay the notification fee of €200 (€50 in the case of a couple in a civil partnership with each other which took place in the State) and provide the Registrar with evidence of their name, address, age, civil status and nationality.

In general, all couples will be asked to produce:-

  • Passport (must be in date)
  • Birth Certificate (must bear an apostille stamp if not issued by the Civil Registration Service in this jurisdiction) If either party is divorced, original final decrees in respect of all previous divorces
  • If either party has a civil partnership dissolution - original dissolutions in respect of all previous civil partnerships
  • If civil partnered to each other outside the State and  which is recognised in the State - copy of original civil partnership certificate
  • If widowed, death certificate of the previous spouse and the civil marriage certificate for their first marriage
  • If a surviving civil partner - the death certificate(s) of the previous civil partner(s) and the civil partnership registration certificate(s), and
  • If party to a civil partnership or marriage that was annulled by an Irish Court - the final decree of nullity and a letter from the relevant court confirming that no appeal was lodged,
  • PPSN - All parties serving notice of intention to marry, who have a current address within the state and/or a future address within the state, must provide a PPSN
  • In the case of a non-national, the person should be  requested to provide a Certificate of Freedom to marry (also known as 'Civil  Letters of Freedom', 'Certificates De Coutume' or 'Certificates of Nulla Osta')  or other documentary confirmation of civil status issued by a relevant  authority of that person's country of origin.
  • Fee of €200 or €50 as above.

Additional documentation may be required in some cases, such as where a divorce has been granted outside the State and it must be determined whether it is recognised under Irish law. The Registrar will advise what is required in each case, including any requirement for an interpreter(s).

Additional documentation may also be required where one or both of the parties to the marriage is/are a foreign national. The Registrar will advise what is required in each case.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE ABOVE LIST IS NOT EXHAUSTIVE. ALL COUPLES SHOULD CHECK DIRECTLY WITH THE REGISTRAR, BEFORE THEIR APPOINTMENT, TO ENSURE THAT THEY HAVE ALL THE REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION.

In addition to their personal particulars, the couple will be requested to provide details in relation to their proposed marriage such as

  • the intended date of marriage
  • whether they require a civil, religious or secular ceremony
  • the names and dates of birth of their witnesses, and
  • details of the proposed solemniser and venue

They will also both have to complete a declaration of no impediment stating that they are not aware of any lawful impediment to the proposed marriage. A list of impediments is contained at Appendix 1 at the end of this webpage.

The Registrar will issue each party to an intended marriage, and the proposed solemniser, with an acknowledgement confirming the date of the receipt of the notification.

It should be noted that these acknowledgements are for record purposes only and are not intended to be a license or certificate signifying the approval of the Registrar concerned to any proposed marriage. All the other legally required marriage preliminaries, as set out in this webpage, must also be complied with.

A person who solemnises or is a party to a marriage where he/she is aware that the three months’ notification of intention to marry has not been given is guilty of an offence and shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding €2,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or both.

There is no requirement for the three month’s notification to be served in the case of a couple who are in a subsisting civil partnership registered in the State.

1.3 Postal Notifications

In very limited circumstances (i.e. critical illness of one of the parties or one or both parties being resident outside the State) and only by prior agreement with the Registrar, it is possible for a couple to post a marriage notification to the Registrar. However, in such cases the couple must still attend the Registrar’s office in person at least 5 days before the marriage to complete their declarations of no impediment and produce the necessary documentation and particulars as set out above, and be issued with their MRF. NOTE:-

Special arrangements can be made where one or both parties are seriously ill; the Registrar will advise you of these if required.

Postal notifications of intention to marry should not be returned to the General Register Office; they should be returned to the Registrar who has authorised the notification to be made by post. In such cases, if either party has been previously married, they must submit the original final divorce decree or death certificate of the former spouse along with the notification. In the first instance, couples should contact a Registrar at one of the Registration Offices to discuss the matter.

The marriage notification can be given to any registrar. It does not have to be a Registrar in the area where the marriage is taking place, or where the couple is living. It may for example be more convenient for a couple to attend a Registrar near their place of work or business. Some counties have more than one registrar; the HSE will be able to advise you of their contact details. Whichever office you choose to attend, you MUST make a prior appointment with the Registrar in order to give three months’ notice of your intention to marry.

1.4 The Marriage Registration Form (MRF)

When the Registrar is satisfied that all required details have been provided and that the couple is free to marry, he or she will issue them with a Marriage Registration Form (MRF) based on the information they have provided. This is a critical document as it is effectively the civil authorisation for the marriage to proceed. All couples wishing to marry in Ireland (whether they require a religious, civil or a secular ceremony) must first be issued with a MRF and any marriage that takes place without a MRF having been issued cannot be civilly registered. The MRF should be given to the registrar or religious or secular solemniser solemnising the marriage prior to the ceremony.

It is strongly advised that couples bring all documents and information requested by the Registrar to their notification meeting, so that the entire process can be completed in one meeting and the MRF can be issued to them immediately.

Locating your local Registrar of Marriage

Check www.civilregistrationservice.ie   for list of local HSE Registration Offices.
NOTE: If the marriage does not take place on the date specified in the MRF, it must take place no later than 6 months from that date. Otherwise, the MRF expires and it will be necessary for the couple to repeat the entire notification process and pay the relevant fee.

1.5 Exemption of some marriages from the age and notification requirements:

If one or both of the parties to the proposed marriage is under eighteen years of age, or if the provision of three months notification poses a difficulty, you may make an application to the Courts for an exemption order and the Court will then decide if the marriage should be allowed to proceed or not. Such applications are made through either the Circuit Family Court or High Court Office in the area where either of the parties reside, with whom contact should be made directly for details as to how to proceed. This is an informal procedure and you may apply in person without employing the services of a solicitor. There is no (Court) charge for such an application. For contact details of the Circuit Courts, click on www.courts.ie.

The Court requires applicants for exemptions to show that their applications are justified by demonstrating good reasons and also that the granting of such an application is in the interests of the parties to the intended marriage.

If the permission of the High Court or Circuit Family Court has not been obtained and either party to the marriage is under eighteen years of age, the Registrar or person solemnising the marriage must not proceed with the marriage ceremony.

Any party to such a marriage or person solemnising a marriage, who is convicted of knowingly breaching the provisions regarding the minimum age for marriage shall be liable to a fine of up to €635.

There is no requirement to obtain parental consent for a marriage or for the making of an application to the Courts.

In cases where an exemption from the 3 months’ notice has been given, the couple must still attend the Registrar’s office in person by appointment at least 5 days before the marriage to complete their declarations of no impediment and produce the necessary documentation and particulars as set out above, and be issued with their MRF. Also, where an exemption is granted from the age requirements only, the couple must of course comply with the notification requirements set out in Section 1.2

The fees charged for a marriage certificate are as follows;

  • €20 for a full standard certificate
  • €1 for a copy for social welfare purposes (letter from Department of Social Protection required)
  • €4 for an uncertified copy of an entry in the Register
  • €10 to have a certificate authenticated (only available from the General Register Office)

1.6 Objections:

Under Section 58 of the Civil Registration Act, 2004, ‘a person may at any time before the solemnisation of a marriage lodge an objection in writing with any Registrar and the objection shall state the reasons for the objection’. This occurred under the old legislation in the form of ‘caveats’. Should you become aware of or be approached about an objection to an intended marriage, you should advise the objector to contact a Registration Office. If the objection is lodged with a different office to where the notification was created, it will be referred from there to the Superintendent Registrar of the area where the notification was given, who must refer it to a Registrar within his or her area to be dealt with (Section 58(2)).

Objections involving an alleged minor error or mis-description in the MRF can be resolved locally by the Registrar, but objections alleging an impediment to an intended marriage must be referred to the Registrar- General or the Superintendent Registrar (if it relates to a marriage of convenience) for a decision.

Where an objection arises in relation to any marriage which indicates that a possible impediment may exist, the intended solemniser (if known) will be notified by the Registrar of the fact that an objection is being investigated and will be directed not to solemnise the marriage until the investigation is complete. The couple will be requested to return the MRF if one has already been issued. When the investigation is complete, the solemniser will be notified as to whether or not the marriage may proceed. If, on the basis of his/her investigations, the Registrar-General or the Superintendent Registrar decide that there is an impediment to the intended marriage, the Registrar is required by the Act to ‘take all reasonable steps to ensure that the solemnisation does not proceed’. If, notwithstanding this, the marriage concerned is solemnised, it cannot be civilly registered.

A party to a proposed marriage may appeal to the Circuit Family Court against the decision of an tArd- Chláraitheoir or Superintendent Registrar in relation to the marriage. 
 

SECTION 2:- The Solemnisation and Registration Process: Requirements for a valid Marriage in Ireland

The following is a broad summary of the procedure for marriages in this State. It applies to both Irish citizens and non-Irish citizens. In all cases the preliminaries outlined at section 1 above must also be complied with and a Marriage Registration Form (MRF) must have been issued by a Registrar and given by the couple to the person solemnising the marriage.

2.1 MARRIAGE BY CIVIL CEREMONY:

A marriage may be solemnised only at a place and time chosen by the parties to the marriage with the agreement of the registered solemniser concerned and if the place chosen is not the office of the solemniser or place referred to in section 51(2) of the CRA 2004, the approval of the place by the Executive (HSE), and the question whether to give or withhold such an approval shall be determined by the Executive by reference to such matters as may be specified by the Minister. The matters specified by the Minister are-

  • Having regard to their primary use, situation, construction and state of repair, the place in which a marriage may be solemnised must, in the opinion of the registrar, be a seemly and dignified venue for the solemnisation of marriages. The primary use of such a venue would render it unsuitable if that use could demean proceedings or bring them into disrepute.
  • The place in which a marriage may be solemnised must have adequate capacity to accommodate the numbers attending the ceremony.
  • Section 51(2) (c) of the Civil Registration Act 2004 provides that a registered solemniser shall not solemnise a marriage unless the place where the solemnisation occurs is ‘a place that is open to the public’. Only venues that allow unrestricted public access without charge will be considered for approval, subject to normal security and health and safety considerations.
  • The place in which a marriage may be solemnised must conform to all the requirements of any place that is open to the public in respect of planning permission, certificate of fire safety and must meet all relevant health and safety requirements.
  • The place in which a marriage may be solemnised must have adequate public liability insurance cover.
  • The place in which a marriage may be solemnised must be accessible to all, including persons with disabilities
  • The place in which a marriage may be solemnised must have no recent or continuing connection with any religion, religious practice or religious persuasion which would be incompatible with the use of the venue for the solemnisation of civil marriages.
  • The place in which a marriage may be solemnised must be clearly identifiable by description and location.
  • The requirement that the marriage be solemnised in ‘a place that is open to the public’ precludes marriages being solemnised in a private dwelling or a courtyard, garden, yard, field or piece of ground that is lying near to and usually enjoyed with the private dwelling.

Please note there will be additional fees for civil marriages at venues other than registry offices. The Registrar will advise you of what fees are due when you are giving your notification.

Couples undergoing a civil ceremony must have been issued with a MRF by a registrar, not necessarily the same registrar who is performing the ceremony. The ceremony must be performed in the presence of two witnesses who should be both over 18 years of age.

At the end of the ceremony, the Registrar, the couple and the witnesses must all sign the MRF. The marriage will then be civilly registered by the Registrar on the basis of the information contained in the MRF as soon as possible after the ceremony.

2.2 MARRIAGE BY RELIGIOUS OR SECULAR CEREMONY

Marriages by religious ceremony or secular ceremony are performed according to the beliefs, rites and ceremonies of the religious body or secular body which is carrying out the ceremony and a registered solemniser may only solemnise a marriage according to the beliefs, rites and ceremony of a religious body or a secular body if he/she is a recognised member of that body.

However, all the civil requirements set out in Section 1 must first be complied with and the couple must have been issued with a Marriage Registration Form by a Registrar which they must show to the person solemnising the marriage. The solemniser must also be a registered solemniser, nominated by his or her religious or secular body, and it is the responsibility of the couple to ensure that the person they wish to solemnise their marriage is on the Register of Solemnisers.

Click here to check Register of Solemnisers

Temporary registrations of solemnisers of religious and secular marriages are possible for those who only wish to solemnise a specific marriage or to solemnise marriages for a specific period of time.

The venue for a religious or secular marriage is a matter for the authorities of the church or religious or secular body under whose auspices the marriage is being performed.

All marriages, civil, religious or secular, must take place at venues which are open to the public.

The ceremony must be performed in the presence of two witnesses who are both over 18 years of age. Both parties must make two declarations: - a) that neither of them knows of any impediment to the marriage; and b) that they accept each other as husband / wife / spouse.

At the end of the ceremony, the solemniser, the couple, and the witnesses must all sign the MRF. The completed MRF should be given to a registrar (not necessarily the registrar who issued it) within 1 month of the ceremony, so that the marriage can be civilly registered. Please note that you will not be able to obtain a civil marriage certificate until such time as the MRF has been returned to a Registrar and the marriage is civilly registered.

2.3 USE OF INTERPRETERS

The services of an interpreter must be obtained where any of the parties to the marriage, the witnesses or the solemniser does not have sufficient knowledge of the language of the ceremony to understand it.  It is the responsibility of the couple to arrange this service.

 

SECTION 3: MARRIAGE OF PERSONS WHO WERE PREVIOUSLY MARRIED OR IN A CIVIL PARTNERSHIP:

3.1 - Marriage of persons who have been previously married or in a civil partnership:

If either party has been married/civil partnered previously (i.e. divorced, has a legal dissolution or partner/spouse is deceased), it is necessary for that party to produce either a Divorce Decree (Absolute), Legal Dissolution of Civil Partnership, Death Certificate as well as a Marriage or Civil Partnership Certificate as appropriate.

If either of the parties to a proposed marriage were previously married, or in a civil partnership this fact should be brought to the attention of the Registrar of Marriages at the time that the notification to marry is being given by the parties to the proposed marriage.

If the parties to the proposed marriage have an existing civil partnership which took place in the State they may marry each other provided they satisfy existing marriage legislation. Dissolution of the civil partnership is effective from the date of marriage.

If the parties to the proposed marriage have a State recognised foreign civil partnership they may marry each other provided they satisfy existing marriage legislation.  It is necessary for the couple to produce their Civil Partnership Certificate.  Upon marriage the civil partnership dissolved.

 

3.1.1 In the case of a divorce granted by a Court of another State the following procedure applies.

  • If the Divorce Decree is in a foreign language, an English translation of the Divorce should be provided, duly certified by a relevant official body or recognised translation agency. In the case of a foreign divorce, consideration is given to the question of whether the divorce is recognisable under Irish law.
  • Where the divorce comes within EU regulations, it is sufficient to confirm that both parties to the divorce were notified of the proceedings and had an opportunity to give evidence to the court which granted the divorce.
  • Where EU regulations do not apply, certain information as to place of birth, countries of residence and other relevant facts must be supplied on a questionnaire provided by the Registrar. The information is then forwarded to the General Register Office, whose consent must be obtained before the ceremony can take place.

If a legal dissolution of a civil partnership is granted outside Ireland, it will be recognised under Irish law if the Minister of Justice and Law Reform has made an order recognising the appropriate class of legal relationships in the jurisdiction in which the dissolution was granted.

The rules regarding the recognition of foreign divorces under Irish law are complex and it is advised that specific enquiries in that regard be addressed to the Marriages Unit of the General Register Office at 090-6632945/6/7/8/9 or 6632970 or through our website www.groireland.ie

3.1.2 In the case of a divorce granted by the Irish Court

The Court decree in relation to the divorce should be presented to the appropriate Registrar of marriages at the point in time when the notification of intention to marry is being given by both parties.

It should be noted that a distinction exists between nullity, separation and divorce and the broad distinctions are outlined below:

  • if no valid marriage existed in the first instance a decree of nullity may be sought from the Irish Courts - a civil decree of nullity means that the first marriage had no legal effect and the parties concerned are free, in civil law, to marry
  • If a valid marriage is in place and a couple separate (by judicial means or by agreement) re-marriage of the parties concerned is not permitted
  • If the parties to a valid marriage subsequently divorce (and this divorce is granted by an Irish court or recognised by this State) the parties concerned may re-marry in civil law

The procedures involved in seeking decrees of nullity, separations or divorces are a matter for the appropriate Courts and Registrars of Marriage do not have any function in regard to those procedures. Contact should be made directly with the appropriate Courts Offices.

It should be noted that an annulment granted by the authorities of the Roman Catholic Church does not have any effect in civil law and persons who have obtained a church annulment only are not free to remarry in civil law.

3.2 Marriage outside of Ireland:

Marriages which take place outside the State are normally registered in the country in which they occur and are NOT registered in Ireland. Persons marrying abroad should ensure that all the legal requirements of the country in question are met, and should enquire as to the procedure for obtaining a marriage certificate from that country - the relevant Embassy and/or religious authorities may be able to advice.

In particular, the Italian Embassy, (63 Northumberland Road, Dublin 4, tel: +353 (0) 1 660 17 44) can provide useful information on marriage in Rome. If a marriage certificate is in a foreign language, it should normally be accepted for official purposes in this State if accompanied by an official translation or a translation from a recognised translation agency. If one or both of the parties to a marriage contracted abroad is or are ordinarily resident in the State, both of them must be over 18 for the marriage to be valid in Irish law.

Certificates of Freedom to marry (also known as 'Civil Letters of Freedom', "Certificates de Coutume" or "Certificates of Nulla Osta") which state that a person is not married, may be needed for marriage in some foreign countries, and are not issued by the General Register Office. Irish citizens living in Ireland wishing to obtain such a Certificate should apply to the Consular Section of the Department of Foreign Affairs, 72/76 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Tel.: +353 (0) 1 4082568. Irish Citizens living abroad should contact their nearest Irish Embassy.

The General Register Office has no function in advising on, or in the registration of, marriages which take place outside the State. There is no facility for registering such marriages in the State, and the civil marriage certificate would normally be accepted as the legal proof of the marriage. In cases where a serious doubt exists as to whether the marriage is recognised in Irish law, legal advice may be sought and an application made to the Circuit Family Court for a ruling under Section 29 of the Family Law Act, 1995 as to whether the marriage is recognisable under Irish law.

3.3 Embassy / Diplomatic Mission Marriage

Marriages performed at foreign embassies/ diplomatic missions in Ireland are not regarded as valid in Ireland. However, when commenced section 19(1) of the Civil Registration (Amendment) Act 2014 will provide for the validation of certain marriages carried out at foreign embassies or diplomatic missions in the State.

In the meantime, Section 19(2) (a) of the Civil Registration (Amendment) Act 2014 provides the opportunity for both parties or the surviving party to a marriage that was solemnised in an embassy or diplomatic mission in the State, prior to the coming into operation of the amendments to the Principal Act, to notify the registrar in writing of their intention not to validate the marriage. This provision is valid during the period 4 December 2014 and the commencement of Section 19 (1) of the above mentioned Act only. Anyone availing of the provision may not subsequently have the said marriage validated

 

SECTION 4: Checklist and useful addresses

4.1 Checklist for couples applying to marry

  • Make appointment with Registrar to give notification of intention to marry (notification must be given at least 3 months in advance of ceremony; couples are advised to do so at the earliest possible stage)

Documents required when giving Notification:-

  • Passport (must be in date)
  • If either party is divorced, original final decrees in respect of all previous divorces
  • If either party is widowed, death certificate of the previous spouse and the civil marriage certificate for the first marriage
  • If either party had a previous civil partnership dissolved, original final decree of dissolution in respect of all previous registered civil partnerships
  • If either party is a surviving civil partner, a death certificate of the civil partner and the civil partnership certificate
  • If civil partnered to each other outside the  State and the civil partnership is recognised in the State -  copy of original civil partnership  certificate
  • In the case of a non-national, the person should be requested to provide a Certificate of Freedom to marry (also known as 'Civil Letters of Freedom', 'Certificates De Coutume' or 'Certificates of Nulla Osta') or other documentary confirmation of civil status issued by a relevant authority of that person’s country of origin. 
  •  

(Additional documentation may be required in some cases, such as where a divorce has been granted outside the State and it must be determined whether it is recognised under Irish law. The Registrar will advise what is required in each case).

If either party is a foreign national, their immigration status documentation (must be in date). A ‘foreign national’ means a person who is neither an Irish citizen, nor a citizen of a member state.

Additional details required:-

  • the intended date of marriage
  • whether the couple require a civil, religious or secular ceremony
  • the names and dates of birth of the two witnesses, and
  • details of the proposed solemniser and venue
  • PPS Number / Public Service Card (where applicable)

Documents Required When Notification Process Complete

  • Declarations of no impediment (these is given to the couple by the Registrar when they are giving notification and should be signed by couple in Registrar’s presence)
  • Marriage Registration Form (MRF) (this is issued to the couple by the Registrar when the notification process is complete). This is the couple’s civil licence to marry. It is a crucial document and your marriage cannot be civilly registered without it

4.2 Registering Your Marriage

  • Ensure that the MRF is signed by both parties, both witnesses and the solemniser immediately after the ceremony
  • Return your MRF to a Registrar (from list below) within a month of the ceremony, so it can be civilly registered

Check www.civilregistrationservices.ie  for list of HSE Registration Offices

4.3 Impediments to Marriage

  • One or both of the parties to the intended marriage will be under the age of 18 years of age, on the date of marriage. (unless an exemption from this provision is granted by the Circuit Family Court or High Court)
  • One or both of the parties to the intended marriage is, or both are, already party to a subsisting marriage or a subsisting civil partnership with a third party
  • One of both parties is incapable by reason of intellectual disability or mental illness of understanding the nature and effect of the marriage contract. (a medical report is required to establish the facts in such cases)
  • The marriage would constitute a Marriage of Convenience
  • The civil marriage would be void by virtue of the prohibited degrees of kindred and affinity

Prohibited Degrees of Kindred and Affinity

A person may not marry their :-

1. Grandparent  2. Grandfather’s Spouse
3. Spouse’s Grandmother     4. Parent’s Sister
5. Parent’s Brother   6. Parent’s Brother’s Spouse
7. Parent’s Sister’s Spouse   8. Spouse’s Parent’s Sister
9. Spouse’s Parent’s Brother     10. Parent
11. Step-parent     12. Spouse’s Parent
13. Child   14. Spouse’s Child
15. Child’s Spouse 16. Sibling
17. Grandchild             18. Grandchild’s Spouse
19. Spouse’s Grandchild     20. Sibling’s Child
21. Sibling’s Child’s Spouse       22. Spouse’s Sibling’s Child

 

4.4 USEFUL ADDRESSES & TELEPHONE NUMBERS:

Registrar-General of Marriages, General Register Office, Government Offices, Convent Road, Roscommon, LoCall 1890-252 076 or 0906-632900;

Department of Foreign Affairs, Consular Section, 80 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Tel. +353 (0) 1 4082568 (Civil Letter of Freedom for marriage abroad);

UK Divorce and Adoption, Family Proceedings Department Registry of the Family Division, First Avenue House, 42 - 49 High Holborn, London WC1V 6NP Tel: +44 (0)20 7947 6000

General Register Office (N.I), Oxford House, 49-55 Chichester Street Belfast BT1 4HL, Tel. +44 (0) 4890 252 000;

The Embassy of Italy, 63 Northumberland Road, Dublin 4; Tel: +353 (0) 1 660 17 44;
The Embassy of the United Kingdom, 31 Merrion Rd, Dublin 4; Tel. +353 (0) 1 2053700

Births, Marriages and Death certificates (England and Wales) General Register Office (GRO), PO Box 2, Southport. Merseyside, PR8 2JD Tel: 0300 123 1837, www.gro.gov.uk

The addresses of the other embassies appear in the telephone directory under Diplomatic & Consular Missions, Embassies.

Registrars of Marriage
Click here for list www.civilregistrationservice.ie

 

SECTION 5: Information for Religious and Secular Solemnisers:

 

Marriage Provisions of the Civil Registration Act, 2004 as amended by the Civil Registration (Act) 2012 Notes for Religious and Secular Solemnisers

The marriage provisions of the Civil Registration Act, 2004 became law on 5th November 2007. This legislation brought about major changes in the procedures for solemnising and registering marriages in the Republic. All those solemnising marriages after the above date are asked to carefully note the contents of this webpage and to ensure that couples approaching them to get married contact their local Registrar of Marriages regarding the new requirements.
The main changes in relation to religious and secular marriages are as follows:-

  • the requirement that all couples attend in person at the Registrar’s office to give their notification, establish their identity and freedom to marry and sign declarations of no impediment;
  • the requirement that all couples must be issued with a Marriage Registration Form (MRF) by a Registrar before the marriage can proceed;
  • the new Register of Solemnisers;  all those solemnising marriages in the State on or after 5th November 2007 must be on this Register which is maintained by the General Register Office;

The Civil Registration (Amendment) Act, 2012 which became law on 23rd January 2013 provides for Secular Solemnisers to solemnise marriages.

The Civil Registration (Amendment) Act, 2014 which became law on 18th August 2014 specifies what constitutes an outdoor venue for marriage.  It also provides that a marriage of convenience is an impediment to marriage. 

The Marriage Act, 2015 which commenced on 16th November 2015 provides for the removal of opposite sex as an impediment to marriage. It also provides for the repeal of civil partnership notifications under the Civil Partnership and Certain Rights and Obligations of Cohabitants Act, 2010 with effect from 16th November 2015 and the registration of a civil partnership with effect from 6 months after the commencement.

 

Marriage Notifications and the Marriage Registration Form (MRF)

 

5.1 Personal Notification

All couples must now present in person to a Registrar to give their three months’ notice (except in very limited circumstances set out below).  They may do so at any office in the country, not necessarily in the area where they intend getting married.  To ensure an orderly and efficient service an appointments system must operate in all Registration Offices in respect of notifications.  All the information made available to couples intending to marry will emphasise that they must, as a first step, contact a Registration Office to make an appointment to give their three month’s notification of intention to marry.

It is intended that in the vast majority of cases, only one visit to the office will be required, by ensuring that couples bring all necessary documents with them on their visit.  All couples will be requested to bring with them to the appointment:-

  • Passport (must be in date)
  • If one or both of them is divorced, the original divorce decrees in respect of any previous divorces they may have
  • If one of them is widowed, the death certificate of his or her previous spouse
  • Name and address of the person they wish to solemnise the marriage
  • Names and dates of birth of their witnesses
  • PPS Number- All parties serving notice of intention to marriage who have a current address within the state and a future address within the state must provide a PPS Number
  • Immigration Status Documentation (if applicable)
  • If civil partnered to each other outside the  State and the civil partnership is recognised in the State -  copy of original civil partnership  certificate

When a couple approaches you with a view to getting married, you should advise them to contact a HSE Registration Office to make an appointment to give notification. For the list of HSE Registration Offices www.hse.ie

Additional documentation may be required in some cases, such as where a divorce or civil annulment has been granted outside the State and it must be determined whether it is recognised under Irish law.  The Registrar will advise what is required in each case.

Additional documentation may also be required where one or both of the parties to the marriage is/are a foreign national. The Registrar will advise what is required in each case.

When they visit the Registrar’s Office, the couple must provide details of their identity, age, civil status, and nationality and also details in relation to their proposed marriage such as the intended date of marriage, whether they require a civil,   religious or secular ceremony, the names and dates of birth of their witnesses, and details of the proposed solemniser and venue.  They will also both have to complete a declaration of no impediment stating that they are not aware of any lawful impediment to the proposed marriage.  It is important to advise couples that they should have all documentation in order before the visit to the Registrar’s Office in order to avoid the necessity for a second visit. In this regard it is essential that the proposed solemniser is on the register at the time of giving notification.

5.2 Postal Notification

In very limited circumstances (where one or both of the couple is living outside the State or one or both of them is seriously ill) and only by prior agreement with the Registrar, it is possible for one or both of the couple to post a marriage notification to the Registrar.  However, in such cases the couple must still attend the Registrar’s Office in person at least 5 days (or such lesser number of days as may be determined by the Registrar) before the marriage to complete their declarations of no impediment and produce the necessary documentation and particulars as set out above, and be issued with their Marriage Registration Form.  Alternative arrangements can be made for couples where one or both of the parties are unable by reason of illness to attend the Registrar’s Office.

Postal notifications of intention to marry should not be returned to the General  Register Office; they should be returned to the Registrar who has authorised the notification to be made by post.  In the first instance, couples should contact a Registration Office from the list on the HSE webpage to discuss the matter www.hse.ie

It is important to note that even though notice of intention to marry may have been given and acknowledged by the Registrar, a marriage cannot proceed without a Marriage Registration Form having been issued to the couple and examined by the solemniser.  The Marriage Registration Form is the civil authorisation for the marriage to proceed.  Any marriage solemnised without a Marriage Registration Form will be null and void in civil law and of no legal effect.

5.3 Minimum Age of Marriage:

Since August 1, 1996 (under the Family Law Act, 1995) the minimum age at which a person, ordinarily resident in the state, may contract a marriage valid in Irish law is eighteen years of age. All persons applying to marry in the State must provide a Registrar with evidence of age and identity. Failure to produce such evidence will result in refusal to proceed with the marriage. Persons aged under 18 years must obtain the permission of the appropriate Circuit Family Court or the High Court to get married.

If the permission of the Circuit Family Court or High Court has not been obtained and either party to the marriage is under eighteen years of age, the Registrar or person solemnising the marriage must not proceed with the marriage ceremony. Any party to such a marriage, or any Registrar or person solemnising a marriage, and who is convicted of knowingly breaching the provisions regarding the minimum age for the marriage shall be liable to a fine of up to €2000 or a prison term not exceeding 6 months or both.

There is no requirement to obtain parental consent for a marriage.

5.4 Exemptions

The existing system of court exemptions from the 3 months’ notice and from the age requirement is retained under the new legislation.

The appropriate Circuit Family Court for exemptions from the age-limit is that for the circuit within which the person concerned lives or works. For exemption from the 3 months notification, it is the circuit within which either party lives or works, or where the marriage is to take place.

In cases where an exemption from the 3 months’ notice has been given, the couple must still attend the Registrar’s office in person by appointment at least 5 days (or such lesser number of days as may be determined by the registrar) before the marriage to complete their declarations of no impediment and produce the necessary documentation and particulars as set out above, and be issued with their MRF. Also, where an exemption is granted from the age requirements only, the couple must of course comply fully with the notification requirements set out in Section 1.1.

Persons in a subsisting civil partnership registered in the State are not required to give 3 months’ notice of intention to marry.

5.5 Marriage Registration Forms

When the Registrar is satisfied that all required details have been provided and that the couple is free to marry, he or she will issue them with a Marriage Registration Form (MRF) based on the information they have provided. This is a critical document as it is effectively the civil authorisation for the marriage to proceed. It replaces the various registration documents (Form A, Schedule G, Special Licence etc.) used under the old Marriage Acts, all of which forms are rendered obsolete by the new legislation.

All couples wishing to marry in Ireland must first be issued with a Marriage Registration Form (MRF) and any marriage that takes place without a MRF having been issued cannot be civilly registered. The MRF should be given to the religious or secular solemniser prior to the ceremony and Registrars will be advising couples accordingly.

5.6 Transitional arrangements

The following transitional arrangements apply:-

  • Where any marriage has been solemnised before 5th November 2007, the old registration form completed after the ceremony (e.g. Form A, Special Licence, Schedule G) will be sufficient for it to be registered;
  • Where a notification has been given prior to 5th November 2007 in respect of a Roman Catholic marriage, and the marriage is solemnised on or after that date, the existing Form A can still be completed by the couple after the ceremony and used to effect civil registration;

 

Solemnisation and Registration

5.7 Register of Solemnisers

Section 53 of the Act as amended provides for the establishment of a Register of Solemnisers. This will consist of civil registrars nominated by and employees of the HSE, religious solemnisers nominated by the religious bodies which they represent and secular solemnisers nominated by the secular bodies which they represent. After 5th November 2007, only those on the Register of Solemnisers may solemnise a marriage. The Register of Solemnisers is maintained by the General Register Office and only GRO staff can add, delete or amend registrations. There is provision under Section 57 of the Act for temporary authorisation to solemnise a marriage. An application can be made to an tArd-Chláraitheoir to allow a member of the body named in the application (who is 18 years or more) a temporary authorisation to solemnise one or more marriages as specified in the authorisation. This provision facilitates situations such as an overseas cleric wishing to perform a marriage of a relative or a cleric who is substituting for another on a short-term basis.

Anyone solemnising a marriage after 5th November 2007 must ensure that he or she is on the Register of Solemnisers. All solemnisers must be 18 years or over and must be nominated by the religious body or the secular body on whose behalf they will be solemnising marriages. Nominations must be made by the relevant authorities in each religious body or secular body, not by the solemnisers themselves. Each nomination must be approved by an tArd-Chláraitheoir, the Registrar-General. Letters confirming registration will be issued to all registered solemnisers. If you have any queries regarding your registration status you should contact the GRO Marriages Unit, Government Offices, Convent Road, Roscommon, phone 090-6632945/7/9 or 6632970, website www.groireland.ie.

5.8 Checking the Marriage Registration Form

A Marriage Registration Form (MRF) is issued to every couple once they have completed the necessary civil preliminaries with the Registrar. The couple is obliged under the Act to give this form to the solemniser before the ceremony (the couple and the solemniser should make their arrangements regarding how and when this is done). The solemniser must check the MRF to ensure that it is correct as far as he or she is aware – this would particularly apply to the details regarding the solemniser and the place where the marriage is taking place. (There will obviously be details on the MRF relating to the couple which the solemniser may not be familiar with).

Section 48(3) of the Act states that a marriage shall not be solemnised unless one of the parties to the marriage has given the relevant MRF to the person solemnising the marriage, for examination by him or her. Under section 69(10)(c) of the Act, a person, who being a registered solemniser, solemnises a marriage without the MRF having been given to him or her, before the solemnisation, for examination by him or her is guilty of an offence.

5.9 Essential Prerequisites for Solemnisation

A registered solemniser may only solemnise a marriage if

  • both parties to the marriage are present;
  • there are two persons professing to be 18 years or over who are present as witnesses (if there is a doubt about the age of the witnesses, evidence of age may be sought);
  • the place where the solemnisation takes place is open to the public and
  • the solemniser is satisfied that the parties to the marriage understand the nature of the marriage ceremony and the required declarations (See 2.4 below).
  • The solemniser has examined the MRF 

Marriages by religious ceremony or secular ceremony are performed according to the beliefs, rites and ceremonies of the religious body or secular body which is carrying out the ceremony and a registered solemniser may only solemnise a marriage according to the beliefs, rites and ceremony of a religious body or a secular body if he/she is a recognised member of that body.

5.10 Declarations to be made by the Parties

Section 51(4) of the Act requires that, from a civil point of view, the form of a marriage ceremony contain two declarations:-

  • a declaration by each of the parties that he or she does not know of any impediment to the marriage and
  • a declaration by each of the parties that they accept each other as husband, wife, spouse

Both these declarations must be made by the couple in the presence of each other, the registered solemniser, and the witnesses. The second declaration (accepting each other as husband/wife/spouse) must be part of the actual marriage ceremony and indeed the couple are taken to be married to each other when this declaration is made. As regards the declaration of no impediment, it is important to remember that this relates to civil impediments only. The Act permits this declaration to be made up to 2 days before the declaration of acceptance of each other as husband/ wife/ spouse. Therefore, the declaration of no impediment can be made separately, such as at a rehearsal or immediately before the start of the ceremony, as long as it is made in the presence of the solemniser and the witnesses and not more than 2 days before the ceremony itself.  See Appendix 3 for details of the suggested text of the declaration.

The civil impediments to marriage are listed in Section 2(2) of the Act as amended and in Appendix 2 of this webpage.

5.11 Interpreters

Section 51 (6) of the Act requires that the services of an accredited interpreter be used where any of the parties or the witnesses or the solemniser to a marriage ‘does not have a sufficient knowledge of the language of the ceremony to understand the ceremony and that language’.  This interpreter must arrange to translate the words of the ceremony into a language known to the person concerned. He or she must not be either a party or a witness to the marriage.

An interpreter at a marriage ceremony is required to sign two statements in the presence of the solemniser:-
1)  before the ceremony, to the effect that he or she understands and is able to converse in any language in respect of which he or she is acting as interpreter at the ceremony, and
2)  immediately after the ceremony, to the effect that he or she has faithfully acted as interpreter at the ceremony. This second statement MUST be written in the language used by the solemniser at the ceremony, and signed by the interpreter in the presence of the solemniser.

NOTE: if an interpreter is required, it is the responsibility of the couple toarrange for this.

5.12 Reissue/Amendment of MRF’s

A Marriage Registration Form (MRF) can be reissued before the marriage where the original has been lost or damaged, or some detail on it has to be changed e.g. a change in the proposed venue or solemniser. The original MRF should be returned to the Registrar.

Section 49(5) of the Act allows for the reissue of MRF’s after the marriage ceremony, where the original has been ‘lost, destroyed or damaged’. Permission for the reissue of the MRF must be sought from the tÁrd-Chláraitheoir via the Civil Registration Office of the HSE.  Upon reissue of the MRF all parties to the marriage must come together with the Solemniser to sign the MRF.

If you become aware before an intended marriage of any necessary change to a MRF, you should advise the couple to contact the Registrar to arrange for the reissue of the MRF at the earliest possible stage before the ceremony.

5.13 Last-minute amendments to the MRF

While couples will be requested to ensure that any necessary changes to the MRF are notified to the Registrar in advance of the ceremony so as to allow for it to be amended and reissued, situations will arise (e.g. illness of the solemniser) where changes will have to be made to the MRF at the ceremony. When this arises, the necessary amendment/s should be clearly made on the MRF by the solemniser and initialed by the solemniser, both parties and both witnesses. There is a section at the end of the MRF which should also be completed and signed, explaining the nature of and reason for the changes. 

Where the original solemniser changes on the day of the marriage the new solemniser must be on the Register of Solemnisers.

5.14 Venues for Religious Marriages and Secular Marriages

Section 52(1) requires that a marriage may be solemnised only at a place and time chosen by the parties to the marriage with the agreement of the registered solemniser.  The venue for a religious marriage or a secular marriage is not required to be registered with or approved by the civil authorities.

Section 52(2) (c) of the Act requires that the venues for all marriages be ‘open to the public’. Churches and other religious buildings would generally meet this requirement. However, private residences (for example) clearly would not.

An exception can be made to this rule where one or both of the couple is seriously ill and a doctor has certified that they are unable by reason of their illness to attend at a place that is open to the public. This is provided for in Section 51 of the Civil Registration Act 2004. In such cases, the local Superintendent Registrar (or the Registrar-General) may grant approval for the marriage to take place at a venue which is not “open to the public” e.g. a private house or a hospice. Should a couple approach you in such a situation, you should seek advice from your local Superintendent Registrar’s office or the Marriages Section of the General Register Office.

5.15 Civil Registration of the Marriage

Immediately after the ceremony, the MRF must be signed by the couple, the two witnesses and the registered solemniser. The MRF should be returned to a Registrar (not necessarily the Registrar who issued the MRF or a Registrar in the area where the marriage took place) within a month of the ceremony so that the marriage can be civilly registered. It is the responsibility of the couple, not the solemniser, to ensure that the MRF is returned to the Registrar.

5.16 Objections

Under Section 58 of the Civil Registration Act, 2004, ‘a person may at any time before the solemnisation of a marriage lodge an objection in writing with any Registrar and the objection shall state the reasons for the objection’. Should you become aware of or be approached about an objection to an intended marriage, you should advise the objector to contact a Registration Office. If the objection is lodged with a different office to where the notification was created, it will be referred from there to the Superintendent Registrar of the area where the notification was given, who must refer it to a Registrar within his or her area to be dealt with.

Objections involving an alleged minor error or mis-description in the MRF can be resolved locally by the Registrar, but objections alleging an impediment to an intended marriage must be referred to the Registrar- General or the Superintendent Registrar (if it relates to a marriage of convenience) for a decision.

Where an objection arises in relation to a proposed marriage which indicates that a possible impediment may exist, the intended solemniser will be notified by the Registrar of the fact that an objection is being investigated and will be directed not to solemnise the marriage until the investigation is complete. The couple will be requested to return the MRF if it has already been issued. When the investigation is complete, the solemniser will be notified should the objection be overturned and the marriage may proceed. If, on the basis of his/her investigations, the Registrar-General or the Superintendent Registrar decide that there is an impediment to the intended marriage, the Registrar is required by the Act to ‘take all reasonable steps to ensure that the solemnisation does not proceed’. If, notwithstanding this, the marriage concerned is solemnised, it cannot be civilly registered.

Should the objection be upheld a party to the proposed marriage may appeal to the Circuit Family Court against the decision of an tArd- Chláraitheoir or Superintendent Registrar.

5.17 Changes to Register of Solemnisers

Section 53(5) of the Act requires all bodies on whose application a solemniser has been registered, to notify the Registrar-General of the death, resignation or retirement of the registered solemniser, or of any change in the information provided at the time of the original application. The General Register Office will then make whatever changes are necessary to the Register of Solemnisers.

5.18 Refusals and Cancellations of Registrations of Solemnisers

Under Section 53(4) of the Act, as amended, the Registrar-General shall refuse to register a solemniser if

  • the nominating body is not a religious body or a secular body;
  • the form of marriage ceremony used by the body concerned does not include both of the declarations required in Section 51(4) of the Act as amended  (see Paragraph 2.4 of this webpage);
  • the form of marriage ceremony used by the body concerned has not been approved by the Registrar-General; or
  • the person nominated to be a solemniser is not a fit and proper person to solemnise a marriage.

Under Section 55 of the Act, as amended, the Registrar-General may cancel the registration of a registered solemniser if

  • the person or the nominating body concerned and stating the reason for cancellation has requested him/her to cancel it;
    • aa. the body concerned (not being the Executive) has ceased to be a religious body or a secular body;
  • the form of marriage ceremony used by the body concerned no longer includes both of the declarations required in Section 51(4) of the Act, as amended (see Paragraph 2.4 of this booklet; or
  • the person
    • has, while a registered solemniser, been convicted of an offence under the Civil Registration Act;
    • has carried on a business of solemnising marriages, for the purpose of profit or gain;
    • is not a fit and proper person to solemnise marriages; or
    • for any other reason, should not continue to be registered.

If the reason for cancellation comes within the categories mentioned in c) above, the Registrar-General must give the solemniser and nominating body at least 21 days’ notice of his intention to cancel the registration, specifying the grounds for the intended cancellation.

Where the Registrar-General refuses to register a person nominated to be a solemniser or cancels an existing registration, he must notify the person and the nominating body of the refusal and the reasons for it, and the person or the nominating body or both of them may appeal to the Minister for Social Protection within 28 days of receiving the notice of refusal.

Where a solemniser has been notified under section (c) above of the Registrar- General’s intention to remove him/her from the Register of Solemnisers he/she above shall not solemnise a marriage.

NOTE: - It is essential that religious bodies and secular bodies have their own internal rules for requesting cancellation of registration.

5.19 Appeals

Under Section 56 of the Act, as amended, where a person or nominating body appeals to the Minister against a refusal or cancellation of a registration of a solemniser, the Minister will receive and consider whatever submissions the parties to the appeal may make to him or her, and he or she may determine whether these will be orally or in writing. After considering such submissions, the Minister will notify the person and body concerned of his or her decision, and give the Registrar-General such directions as he or she considers appropriate.

Where the Minister dismisses an appeal under this Section solely on the grounds that the nominating body is not or has ceased to be a religious body or a secular body, that body may appeal against that dismissal to the Circuit Court. If the Minister dismisses an appeal on any other grounds, a party to the appeal may appeal against the dismissal on a point of law, also to the Circuit Court. The Circuit Court’s jurisdiction on the appeal must be exercised by a judge of the circuit in which the person making the appeal ordinarily resides or carries on a business, profession or occupation, or (where the appeal is by the nominating body or the body and the person jointly) by a judge of the circuit where that body has its principal place of business or principal office.

  

APPENDIX 1

Checklist for Religious and Secular Solemnisers

Marriage Registration Form Received ______________Checked ______________

Declaration of No Impediment Made ____________________________________*

Declaration of Acceptance as Husband, Wife, Spouse Made _______________________

MRF signed by Solemniser     _______ Couple _________ Witnesses____________

If Interpreter Needed, 2 Interpreter Statements Signed ________________________

MRF returned to couple for forwarding to Registrar _________________________
* Wording of verbal declaration of no impediment is as follows:-
I hereby state that I have read and I understand the list of civil impediments to marriage and I solemnly declare that I believe there is no impediment of kindred or affinity or other lawful hindrance to my proposed marriage with


__________________________

 

 

APPENDIX 2

Impediments to Marriage

Capacity to Marry

A marriage solemnised between persons either of whom is under the age of 18 years is not valid unless an exemption from this provision is granted by the appropriate Circuit Family Court or High Court.

Monogamy

Marriage is a union between two people. If at the time of the marriage ceremony either party is already validly married to or in a civil partnership with a third party, the marriage is void.

Mental Illness/Intellectual Disability

One or both parties is incapable by reason of mental illness or intellectual disability of understanding the nature and effect of the marriage contract (a medical report is required to establish the facts in such cases);

Marriage of convenience

‘Marriage of convenience’ means a marriage where at least one of the parties to the marriage –

  • at the time of entry into the marriage is a foreign national, and
  • enters into the marriage solely for the purpose of securing an immigration advantage for at least one of the parties to the marriage.

Prohibited Degrees of Kindred and Affinity

A person may not marry their :-

1. Grandparent  2. Grandfather’s Spouse
3. Spouse’s Grandmother     4. Parent’s Sister
5. Parent’s Brother   6. Parent’s Brother’s Spouse
7. Parent’s Sister’s Spouse   8. Spouse’s Parent’s Sister
9. Spouse’s Parent’s Brother     10. Parent
11. Step-parent     12. Spouse’s Parent
13. Child   14. Spouse’s Child
15. Child’s Spouse 16. Sibling
17. Grandchild             18. Grandchild’s Spouse
19. Spouse’s Grandchild     20. Sibling’s Child
21. Sibling’s Child’s Spouse       22. Spouse’s Sibling’s Child

 

APPENDIX 3

Declaration under Section 51(4) (a) of the Civil Registration Act 2004

I hereby state that I have read and I understand the list of civil impediments to marriage and I solemnly declare that I believe there is no impediment of kindred or affinity or other lawful hindrance to my proposed marriage with __________________________ (Insert name of Other Party)

 

APPENDIX 4

Contacts

General Note: If you require further information please contact your local Health Service Executive Registration Office, Civil Registrar's Office or The General Register Office, Government Buildings, Convent Road, Roscommon, Tel: LoCall 1890 252076 or +353 (0) 9066-32900.

For a list of local HSE Registration Offices please see : www.hse.ie

Last modified:13/06/2016
 

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